Other

Brothy Beans and Farro with Eggs and Mushrooms


Stirring a raw egg yolk into each bowl at the end adds silkiness, heft, and protein. But this dish is satisfying without it, too. The secret to delicious-tasting beans is infusing the cooking liquid with aromatics like onions and garlic, then seasoning it liberally at the end until it's just shy of salty.

Ingredients

  • 1 small onion, unpeeled, halved
  • 4 garlic cloves, 1 smashed, 3 finely chopped
  • 1½ cups dried gigante, runner, or lima beans, soaked overnight, drained
  • 1 cup farro or spelt, soaked overnight, drained
  • 2 red Fresno chiles, seeds removed, finely chopped
  • ⅓ cup plus 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons finely chopped rosemary
  • 8 ounces maitake or shiitake mushrooms, torn into bite-size pieces
  • 2 teaspoons sherry vinegar or red wine vinegar
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 4 large egg yolks, room temperature

Recipe Preparation

  • Bring onion, carrot, smashed garlic, beans, and 14 cups water to a boil in a medium pot, reduce heat, and simmer, stirring occasionally, until beans are creamy but still intact, 70–90 minutes (time will vary depending on size and age of beans). Using a slotted spoon, transfer beans to a medium bowl; discard onion, carrot, and garlic.

  • Return broth in pot to a boil and add farro. Reduce heat and simmer, stirring occasionally, until grains are tender, 25–30 minutes. Remove from heat and return beans to pot; season generously with salt. Let sit 15 minutes to infuse beans and grains with flavor. (If you have the time, cook the beans and the grains a day ahead so they can really soak up the broth. If not, no worries—just keep going.)

  • Cook chopped garlic, chiles, and ⅓ cup oil in a medium skillet over medium heat, stirring often, until garlic is golden, about 4 minutes. Remove from heat and mix in rosemary. Transfer chile-garlic oil to a small bowl; season with salt.

  • Wipe out skillet and heat remaining 3 Tbsp. oil over medium-high. Cook mushrooms, undisturbed, until browned underneath, about 2 minutes. Toss and continue to cook, tossing every so often, until mushrooms are browned and crisp in most spots, another 6–8 minutes. Splash vinegar over mushrooms, season with salt and pepper, and give skillet a few shakes to combine.

  • Ladle stew into bowls and top each with some crisped mushrooms and an egg yolk (if using); drizzle with chile-garlic oil.

  • Break egg yolk and stir into soup just before eating to give it a more silky consistency.

  • Do Ahead: Stew (without mushrooms, egg yolks, and chile-garlic oil) can be made 3 days ahead. Let cool; cover and chill.

Reviews SectionI, too, heard about this from “The Splendid Table” podcast and was impressed with the result. This is a craveable dish that I make repeatedly, (without the eggs, due to allergy)). I even keep the rosemary garlic chili oil out to put on other dishes. The layers of flavor and texture pop in my mouth. Shitakes and maiitakes together work for me. I first ordered gigante beans for a special occasion meal, but now mostly use limas which I prefer. I use less water than indicated because I make it in a pressure cooker and I also keep the veggies in the soup. Thank you for this recipe.Andy waxed poetic about this dish last winter on The Splendid Table, and it really didn't live up to the hype. This is just another example of a BA recipe asking you to devote hours of your life for a very mediocre result.I'm tired of BA posting pretty pictures without explaining how they get there. If you want a nice clear broth, you've got to cook your beans without even a hint of a simmer. If you're not skilled at cooking beans with such fuss, use a slow cooker for clear broth. But then, when you cook your Farro in the bean liquid, the Farro will release a ton of starch and make your bean liquid cloudy anyway. So, why did they post such a nice photo? To get you to make it. They probably cooked their Farro in a pot of salted water and drained the water so as not to muddy the dish when taking photos. I am tired of food stylists. That being said, this dish is tasty if you like beans, grains, mushrooms, and spicy food, and investing hours of your time into simple food.AnonymousLos Angeles, CA06/05/20Awesome awesome soup recipe! I used regular white beans in place of lima or other big beans because I couldn't find any, and I used quick cook farro from Trader Joe's. Just adjust the times of cooking accordingly (always stand by and taste every so often!). Definitely make a little more broth than it calls for, I ended up dumping some chicken stock in at the end to make more. Also, add miso! I added a couple tablespoons in the beginning and it made everything better. Yolk is also a must!AnonymousLas Vegas, Nevada05/29/20This was really great! I'm in NYC and stuck in the house, so all day cooking projects are quite welcome. Some changes - I chopped carrots and two onions instead of leaving whole and we kept them in the broth. I used dried shitakes and used their soaking liquid in the broth. We replaced the farro with cauliflower rice. We had some of the jarred crunchy chili garlic so I used that instead of making chili oil. We had fresh sourdough multiseed bread that I made earlier in the weed to go with it and it was really delicious! I agree with the previous comment that it's a bit fussy but if you don't mind it, it's worth the end result!So so delicious. Mine does not look like the image pictured above, but oh well. Each component, the beans, the farro, the chili garlic oil, and the mushrooms all make this such an amazingly delicious (and meat free!) dish. It is so worth the time and effort and makes for a swooningly good lunch days later even. If you are not vegan, don't skip the yolk, it makes for such a creamy, silky finish. My substitutions/changes/takes: I used large lima beans - seemed to work well. I used about 4 cups of veggie stock and less water than called for. (I wanted flavor over consistency) I substituted jalapenos for the fresnos as I can never find fresnos in my area. I soaked the farro and beans overnight the night before, made them, and then let them sit in the broth for a few hours - I think this made for a really nice flavor. Am planning on making this at least a few times a month!curlyglamourgirlieLawn Guyland, NY01/14/20kind of disappointed with this one, but still a dish worth making/eating. i'd like to try it with maiitake mushrooms instead of the shiitake i had.This is such a comforting warm recipe. It has a lot of depth for a bean dish. We definitely used the egg yolk! My only question/concern is I made the beans and farro early in the day and when I went to heat them up to finalize the dish for dinner they had soaked up all of the bean broth. I added some water to thin as I warmed them. It turned out out great but is there a way to keep it brother if you made the beans and farro ahead?marniewarnerCrozier,VA01/10/20This soup recipe is impressive and will impress the lucky mouths you share it with. It’s beautiful and delicate on the outside and packs a deep, rich flavor on the inside. The silky egg yolk provides a luxurious texture you didn’t expect. Don’t skip it unless you want to punish your tastebuds. This recipe takes time and love so consider saving it for a Sunday or making the beans ahead of time. Regardless, it’s one-hundred percent worth it.holds a deep depth This soups depth of flavor is savory, rich, and perfectly delicious.stephaniedarcy14527Seattle12/03/19This recipe was wildly successful with my family. Everyone including my 6 year old, 10 year old and husband loved it. I agree it feels like lots of steps, but next time I will cook and keep the beans ready ahead of time to save on actual cooking time the day of the meal. Two changes to the recipe: I used Rancho Gordo Mayacoba beans and I added a few drops of liquid smoke which I felt elevated this dish above and beyond the norm. The combination of the smoky flavor and silky egg yolk was amazing.AnonymousNew Delhi, India11/25/19The first bite of this was shockingly delightful. I spent my afternoon making this soup while getting some other work done and couldn't really imagine what it was going to taste like as I was preparing it. It came together quite easily. I didn't soak my beans overnight nor the farro. Instead, I soaked just an hour or so before I started cooking. I ended up adding a few extra cups of water to the beans as they were cooking as they needed extra time. FYI, in case you're like me and have a hard time planning a day ahead. I'll certainly be making this dish again. It is very silky and cozy, with or without the yolk, and would definitely wow a few guests joining you on a crisp fall evening along with a great bottle of red wine.AnonymousPhiladelphia10/07/19I've made this soup a few times, and it is freakishly good. I love lima beans, sherry, and maitakes, so the pitch was certainly easy, but the body the farro brings to the table is wonderfully lush and round, and the rosemary is truly indispensable; who knew sherry vinegar needed the help. I don't even make it with the egg and it's one of my favorite soups. If I had to pick one soup recipe to make on a date, which is admittedly somewhat contrived, this'd be it. I'm making it later this week, thank the gods. Andy be PraisédAnonymousLos Angeles, California09/07/19Clever, clever, clever recipe. Made almost as written. Browned the vegetables in a really hot skillet to add color and flavor to the cooking stock, and also added a porcini mushroom bouillon cube to the stock. Also eliminated a step, cooked the beans about half done and went ahead and added the farro. Definitely a Sunday afternoon endeavor, but completely worth it.AnonymousLawrence Kansas02/17/19This was a decent recipe and helped show a dried beans newbie like myself the basis of cooking them and using the water to make a broth. Someone else pointed out that the recipe was missing some key salting steps - make sure you salt the water the beans are cooking in! I probably added two tablespoons of kosher salt while they were cooking and that was about right, and then a little more with the spelt. I would imagine the broth would be really bland without salting it up front.I also added around three cups of water to the broth after taking the beans out because it had reduced so much and I’m glad I did, otherwise there wouldn’t have been enough broth at the end.The toppings were great and don’t skip the egg yolk! That turned the broth into a super silky rich liquid.As a side note, I don’t know how the broth in the recipe photo looks so red since the only red ingredient is the chiles, so don’t worry if yours doesn’t look like that (mine was more of a light brown color)Really loved the flavors and how it all came together. I agree that it takes a lot of time to make this, but because it comes out so beautiful in the end, it's a good candidate for a special meal with people over who'll appreciate it. I did what the recipe suggested and made the soup part (and the chili oil) one day and left the mushroom finisher for the next day. It was def even tastier on the second day, and putting it together was quick at the end.This tastes amazing but it was a bit tedious. I made it in an instant pot, and I think a simple stovetop pressure cooker would have been easier for me. Next time I do this, I hope to add the farro in 20 min before the beans are done, and then have them cook together rather than take them out and then put the beans back in.All the flavor components are great, do not leave them out. The chili oil, the egg, the mushrooms. I thought I would want more wild mushrooms than the amount listed, but it was actually the perfect balance.yuzuyuzuMinneapolis/chicago03/10/18I've made this soup so many times this winter! So flavorful and filling--the shiitake mushrooms sauteed in vinegar are such a nice counterpoint.this is unbelievably too fussy for a soup!

Pumpkin season is in full swing and this easy pumpkin coffee cake is just what you need. Best of all, you can freeze this coffee cake for later!

Categories

About Tried & True Recipes

Welcome to Tried & True Recipes!

My name is Kylie Perrotti, and I started Tried & True Recipes in 2016 because I wanted to share simple, elegant, and easy recipes that can be made any day of the week.

Stay awhile and I hope you find a delicious meal to make!

Be sure to tag @triedandtruerecipes on Instagram with your favorite recipe for a chance to be featured.


Legumes such as beans (think: cannellini, kidney, navy, or black) and lentils are heart-healthy forms of protein and are packed with folate, antioxidants, and fiber. If you want to incorporate more beans and lentils into your diet, you're in luck. Here, we're sharing 30 recipes that transform beans, chickpeas, lentils, and other legumes into light vegetarian dinners that you can make any day of the week.

You'll love our recipe for Grilled Vegetables and White-Bean Fattoush&mdashthe colorful spread of cannellini beans, bell peppers, escarole, red onions, crumbled feta, and pita chips that you see right here comes together in less than an hour. It's a hearty salad that you can absolutely serve as a main course salad. We also have several soup recipes in this collection that will soothe your soul and satisfy your appetite. Some come together in under an hour, but others cook at a low heat for a long period of time in a crock pot, slowly marrying the flavors of the legumes, vegetables, and herbs together. No matter which path you choose, we guarantee you'll scoop up every last drop.

The beauty of beans is that they're so versatile. You can cook them and serve them with rice or crusty bread, sprinkled over a salad, or tucked into pitas. We have a simple recipe that will teach you how to cook dried black beans in a flash and another recipe that features a preparation to upgrade a can of beans. Whichever method you decide to take or recipe you choose to whip up, you're guaranteed a delicious vegetarian dinner when you make legumes the star of the meal.


Directions

Place the turkey, egg, breadcrumbs, allspice, nutmeg, salt, and pepper in a large bowl and mix together well with your hands.

Form the mixture into 20 equal-sized meatballs. It’s helpful to divide the mixture in half and then in half again and so on to make sure the meatballs are the same size. Wetting your hands with cold water will help keep the mixture from sticking to them. You can also make the meatballs a little smaller or a little larger—just keep them all about the same size so that they cook evenly.

Place the stock, sour cream, and Worcestershire sauce in a medium bowl and whisk well to combine.

Transfer the mixture to a large nonstick skillet over high heat (if you have a non-metal whisk, you can just whisk the mixture in the skillet). The second the mixture comes to a boil, turn the heat to low and add the meatballs in an even layer.

Simmer the meatballs uncovered, using tongs
to turn them every so often to make sure they cook evenly, until the meatballs are very firm to the touch and cooked through (break into one to check it), about 20 minutes.

Sprinkle the meatballs with the parsley (if using). Serve hot, making sure everyone gets plenty of sauce with their serving.

Brothy Beans and Farro with Eggs and Mushrooms

By Andy Baraghani for Bon Appétit

There are plenty of great recipes out there for brothy beans and I particularly love this recipe by Andy Baraghani. The best part about it is you can use what you have on hand to add flavor to the beans—aromatics like a fennel bulb that is about to go bad, an extra clove of garlic, ginger, etc. Baraghani’s recipe elevates the humble bean with delicious toppings like seared mushrooms, egg yolks, and chili oil. But remember, it’s the beans and the broth that are the real stars. I think eating them with toast or a salad could also make for a really lovely and satisfying combination.

Greek-ish Grain Salad (or any kind of grain salad you prefer!)

By Carla Lalli Music for Kitchn

Depending on what I have on hand, I can make a huge batch of any kind of grain salad and feast on the leftovers all week. To mix it up, I’ll add different toppings like hot sauce, a soft boiled egg, chopped chicken—whatever I fancy. If you are someone who needs to follow a recipe, one of my favorites is this Greek-ish Grain Salad from Carla Lalli Music, author of Where Cooking Begins. I almost always have these ingredients on hand. If you are looking for an easier way to keep up this habit of making a big grain salad each week, try learning to make one without a recipe. Here is a great guide for learning this skill!

By Yours Truly

These no-recipe recipes are so delicious, combining the perfect amount of salt, acid, heat, and fat to each bite, proving a great tasting meal doesn’t have to be complicated. My favorite way to eat open-faced sammies lately has been to use leftover tuna salad topped with a really lovely cheese that melts well (hello, Wood River Creamery!) atop the end of a loaf of bread that would otherwise sit untouched by anyone else in my family.

Kate is currently learning to play the Ukulele, much to the despair of her husband, kids, and dogs. Follow her on Instagram at @witanddelight_.


Forget the constant stirring over a hot stove: this easy oven risotto is a game changer.

Cauliflower steaks are one of our favorite vegetarian main dishes, especially when topped with yogurt and a vibrantly spiced coconut relish. You can save any extra bits of cauliflower for roasting or making cauliflower rice.

Since 1995, Epicurious has been the ultimate food resource for the home cook, with daily kitchen tips, fun cooking videos, and, oh yeah, over 33,000 recipes.

© 2021 Condé Nast. All rights reserved. Use of this site constitutes acceptance of our User Agreement and Privacy Policy and Cookie Statement and Your California Privacy Rights. Epicurious may earn a portion of sales from products that are purchased through our site as part of our Affiliate Partnerships with retailers. The material on this site may not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with the prior written permission of Condé Nast. Ad Choices


Leftover Beef and Vegetable Soup Recipe

A few weeks ago I went to visit my sister and folks in New Jersey. My sister Gail was cooking up a pot of soup for lunch that smelled pretty good.

She had a lot of leftovers from the week including some leftover London Broil that she grilled up the night before.

This is one of those recipes that are just thrown together in the moment with leftovers in the refrigerator and the pantry. It’s one of my favorite ways of cooking. Finding creative ways to use up leftovers is not that hard and makes one night of cooking a lot easier.

My sister doesn’t own a real good soup pot so she had to saute all the vegetables in a fry pan and then transfer them to her inexpensive all-purpose pot.

If she tried to saute in the thin-bottomed, inexpensive pot, there is a good chance she would have burned them and ruined the soup.

I try using as few pans as possible when I cook at home. There is enough stuff to do with the kid’s homework and getting them ready for bed.

I don’t need to be cleaning any extra pans. Nor does my sister, so I have a good idea what to get her for Christmas this year. I’ll have to go back and read my article on Choosing and Buying a Good Soup Pot.

My sister used leftover London Broil, which is really a cooking method and not a cut of beef but most of us have associated it with a top round roast that can be cooked whole, cut in half or cut into steaks. Any leftover cooked beef would work well in this recipe.


Brothy Beans and Farro with Eggs and Mushrooms - Recipes

Mushrooms are the edible fruit parts of several species of macrofungi. Macrofungi is a fungus that bears fruits big enough for humans to see. They can be seen either below or above the ground where people can handpick them. The first signs of mushroom consumption were in China many years ago. White mushrooms are the most commonly planted mushrooms.

  • Not all mushrooms are edible. Some can have poisonous effects on the human system.
  • Therefore, it is vital to confirm accurately if a particular mushroom is safe to eat. Some people could even have allergies to edible mushrooms.

Top six mushrooms commonly consumed in the US include:

  • Oyster
  • Shiitake
  • Chanterelle
  • Enoki
  • Cremini
  • Portabella.

Mushrooms taste good when included as a component in many foods. They have good nutritional content, as well.

Origin of mushrooms

The word “mushroom” came from the French word for fungi. The consumption of mushroom dates to ancient centuries. The first visible signs of edible mushroom were several hundreds of years back in China. Chinese people also used the mushroom for medicinal purposes. Top-class Romans and Greeks also ate mushrooms. Mushrooms were often preserved, used for extra additional nutrition during the winter. The cultivation of Mushrooms got to the United States in the late 1800s from Mexico. In the early 1900s, mushrooms were introduced into Holland for the first time.

Functions

Mushroom is a good ingredient in foods. Here are 15 recipes where the mushroom is included:

Mushroom nutrition

The USDA(United States Department of Agriculture) says that one cup(70g) of raw mushroom slices contains the following:

  • Calories: 15
  • Carbohydrates: 2.3g
  • Fiber: 0.7g
  • Sugars: 1.4g
  • Protein: 2.2g
  • Fat: 0.2g
  • Sodium: 4mg

According to the research, mushrooms have the following benefits.

  • Mushrooms have antioxidant properties that help to fight cellular damage.
  • They may be capable of promoting heart health.
  • They may help to improve insulin resistance and lower blood sugar level.
  • They have potential cancer-fighting properties.

Mushrooms can cause adverse effects when eaten, along with alcohol. This could result in a racing heart and tingling sensation in the body. Consuming wild mushrooms can cause effects like diarrhea, cramps, and vomiting. It is best to be careful before eating mushrooms to know the ones that are not harmful to humans.

Application

You can decide to wash mushrooms and eat them raw. However here are a few tips that will help you to cook them if you wish to do so

  • Slice the mushrooms into almost the same size. This will enable them to prepare at an equal rate.
  • A mix of butter and olive oil will be good to prepare mushrooms.
  • Add pepper and salt for seasoning.

Fresh mushrooms can last for only three to four days. Freezing, canning, drying, and powdering are ways to preserve mushrooms. If you decide to, you can soak dried mushrooms to rehydrate them.

FDA regulations

The Food and Drug Administration has a standard of identity for the production and safe consumption of canned mushrooms.


Cozy cabbage and farro soup

Last April, Food52’s Cookbook Club chose Smitten Kitchen Every Day as their book to cook through that month, but I promise, this isn’t the point at all. The club has monthly picks and a yearly Bonus Book, a cookbook participants cook through at their leisure. So while April was my book’s month, for 2018, that book was Six Seasons by Joshua McFadden.


I already loved this book. We talked about it that month in regard to a crunchy asparagus salad that I mixed with chopped jammy eggs on toast, with a photo that still makes me smile. I told you that you needed to buy that book right then, especially if you also delighted in inventive but not overly complicated vegetable preparations (225 of them, even) and things you hadn’t thought of but would immediately tuck into your repertoire.

But because I checked on the group multiple times a day to respond to comments and questions on my cookbook recipes, I also read many posts about things the group were simultaneously cooking from the Six Seasons book and I need to tell you that probably 40% of these posts extolled the virtues of the book’s Comforting Cabbage and Farro Soup.

You’re about to tell me that you don’t want to eat a cabbage soup. That you don’t find cabbage “comforting.” That you have nightmares of having to eat stewed or braised cabbage growing up, and you’re an adult and you’re not going to do that anymore. You’re probably thinking that this soup is very brown and beige, not exactly a looker, amiright? But that’s exactly my point. This soup is not going to sell itself. I had that book for a year, and had never once paused on this page to consider whether I needed this soup in my life. It took these repeated, sometimes multiple times in a day, posts from random internet strangers reporting that they, too, had made the soup the night before, and it had exceeded all of their cabbage and also soup hopes and dreams for me to become convinced that I might find it wonderful too.

And they were right. So now, I must do the same for you. I know it’s not pretty. I imagine that you’re skeptical. But the cabbage is slowly cooked down with onion and garlic — think Marcella Hazan’s famous smothered cabbage, but even better — then expanded best stock you have (homemade chicken is great here, but non-homemade or vegetable will work too) and then farro and then, at the end, you add a squeeze of lemon juice to the pot and it shakes the entire foundation of the soup into something bright and fascinating. In bowls, you finish it with a drizzle of olive oil, shaved parmesan, salt and pepper, with extra lemon on the side. It’s the coziest, warmest, most filling thing, and the exact soup I needed to kick 2019 off with. I hope you agree.

Previously

[Psst! Kicking January off with a new soup recipe for, like, balance and stuff, is an almost yearly tradition here at SK.]

And for the other side of the world:
Six Months Ago: Corn Fritters
1.5 Years Ago: Confetti Party Cake
2.5 Years Ago: Peaches and Cream Bunny Cake
3.5 Years Ago: Oven Ribs, Even Better
4.5 Years Ago: Blue and Red Berry Ricotta Galettes

Cozy Cabbage and Farro Soup

  • Servings: 4
  • Time: 1 hour
  • Source:Adapted from Six Seasons

While this soup could be vegetarian (using vegetable stock), or even vegan (skipping the parmesan), you could also go in the other direction, adding a ham hock or beef shank for a heartier soup. You could use rice instead of farro, but I do like the chewiness of the grain here.

As always with recipes with short ingredient lists, and rather plain ingredients, seasoning is everything. Keep adding salt and pepper until it tastes right.

Finally, my cabbage tends to brown and seem fully cooked far sooner than the recipe suggests it will be (30 minutes). I end up moving the recipe along sooner, and it’s not a problem. I’ve used savoy cabbage both times it’s possible that with a regular green cabbage, it might need the full softening time.

  • 1 pound cabbage, savoy or green
  • Olive oil
  • 1 medium onion, thinly sliced
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 3 garlic cloves, smashed and peeled
  • 1 sprig of rosemary or thyme (optional because I’ve forgotten it each time, and not regretted it)
  • 1 tablespoon red wine or white wine vinegar
  • 2/3 cup uncooked farro
  • About 4 cups homemade or storebought chicken or vegetable broth
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
  • Shaved parmesan, to finish

Meanwhile, in a small skillet, heat a glug of olive oil over medium and add the uncooked farro. Toast it, stirring, for a few minutes, until half a shade darker.

When the cabbage is ready, stir in the vinegar. Taste and season with more salt and pepper. Add toasted farro and broth. Bring mixture to a lazy simmer and cook for 25 to 35 minutes, until farro is tender and all the flavors are married. The soup will be very thick, but if you’d prefer more liquid, add another 1/2 cup broth or water. Taste and adjust seasoning again. Stir in lemon juice.

Ladle into bowls and finish each with a drizzle of olive oil and a shower of parmesan, with more parmesan passed at the table.

Do ahead: Soup keeps well in the fridge for 3 days, and for weeks or longer in the freezer.


BEANS & CO: PAIRINGS THAT WORK

If your kitchen repertoire is feeling predictable, it may be time to explore some new protein options. Chicken breasts, take a break. Let dry and canned beans energize your cooking by sparking your creativity. They introduce colors, textures, shapes and flavors that boost plate appeal. And they play so well with others. As you explore the world of beans, you will find they lead you to other legumes and grains — their nutritious companions in classic dishes around the world.

Beans with beans: Tweak familiar bean dishes by adding unexpected twists. If you normally make chili with kidney beans, try a three-bean version, adding pink and pinto beans to the mix. Everybody makes hummous with chick peas, but preparing it with Great Northern beans becomes your fresh idea. Three-bean salad? Made with kidney beans, fresh green beans or wax beans and edamame, this oldtimer has renewed appeal. Pair cranberry beans with Great Northern beans in minestrone or pasta e fagioli. Dress cooked kidney, cranberry and Great Northern beans with vinaigrette and fold in poached shrimp or high-quality canned tuna. Spoon over butter lettuce for an appealing summer salad.

Beans with grains: Pairing beans with grains makes a complete protein, supplying all nine essential amino acids. That’s why Mexican cooks accompany pinto beans with tortillas Indians serve legumes with rice and Middle Eastern diners love beans with bulgur. The marriage of beans and grains isn’t just nutritionally sound it’s ancient, delicious and enduring. For maximum nutritional impact, combine beans with whole grains, such as whole-wheat pasta or bread, wheat berries, barley, bulgur, corn, farro, kamut, quinoa and brown rice. A few possibilities:

Turkish red bean and bulgur soup with lemon and mint
Pinto bean tostadas with shredded chicken, avocado and queso fresco
Black bean and corn salad with green onions
Tabbouleh with kidney beans
Farro risotto with cranberry beans
Poblano chiles peppers stuffed with rice, corn and black beans
Navy bean soup with mushrooms and barley
Whole wheat pita with grilled lamb and white bean hummous
Cavatelli with white beans and chile oil
Whole-wheat bruschetta with white bean puree and wilted greens


JO ON FOOD, LIFE AND A SCENT OF CHOCOLATE

Having hunted high and low, I finally came across this picture which was sent to me a year or two back. It is our Thames Barge Iota now just disintegrating at Windsor apparently. I must say, she doesn't look much like the Iota I remember at all. We had a wheelhouse at the stern for a start. It is impossible to read the name on the transom (back end) but I was definitely told it was her. Looking at this picture again, I am beginning to wonder. Whichever barge this is though, it is sad to see it so neglected.

/>Anyway, after Sunfish my father decided to buy a boat which was actually built as a yacht and he found one in, I think, South Africa. She was brought back to England and my parents moved on board with my three young cousins who were being cared for by my parents. We had lots of fun times on Pamara although by then I was living away from my family. My dad retired and took Pamara out to Malta where they lived for a few years taking trips here and yon. For some of their voyages I joined them some I was unable to. I was with them in 1969 when they went to Yugoslavia (as it was then called) and the day I left was the day they walked on the moon. John, first husband, and I caught a cab to the airport and the driver had the radio tuned into the landing. He figured we had a TV on board, we didn't. The broadcast was in English but with commentary in the local language so we had trouble figuring out what was going on. We saw it all when we got back to the UK. My father really never got to see any of it which was a shame as he would have been very interested. They left Malta and cruised the Med stopping at various ports in Italy and France. I joined them in Southern France. Finally ending up in Alicante, Spain where they eventually sold Pamara and bought a delightful house to live in outside the town. I loved that part of Spain.

One thing I neglected to tell you about Silver Sunfish, she was used for mine sweeping during the war. Obviously she survived.

Tuesday our Foot Nurse came and was a bit took aback I think to see Matt with his air cast boot. However, he took it off and she treated his feet and mine of course.

Matt finally got his Health Card in the mail too.

Oh, and did you you Tuesday January 16 was Dragon Day?

I am very fond of soups and broths with beans in them so here is one that appealed to me from Bon Appétit today. Great food for dragons.

Brothy Beans and Farro with Eggs and Mushrooms

Stirring a raw egg yolk into each bowl at the end adds silkiness, heft, and protein. But this dish is satisfying without it, too. The secret to delicious-tasting beans is infusing the cooking liquid with aromatics like onions and garlic, then seasoning it liberally at the end until it's just shy of salty

1 small onion, unpeeled, halved
1 medium carrot, peeled
4 garlic cloves, 1 smashed, 3 finely chopped
1 ½ cups dried gigante, runner, or lima beans, soaked overnight, drained
1 cup farro or spelt, soaked overnight, drained
Kosher salt
2 red Fresno chiles, seeds removed, finely chopped
1/2 cup plus 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
2 Tbs finely chopped rosemary
8 oz maitake or shiitake mushrooms, torn into bite-size pieces
2 tsp sherry vinegar or red wine vinegar
Freshly ground black pepper
4 large egg yolks, room temperature

1. Bring onion, carrot, smashed garlic, beans, and 14 cups water to a boil in a medium pot, reduce heat, and simmer, stirring occasionally, until beans are creamy but still intact, 70󈟆 minutes (time will vary depending on size and age of beans). Using a slotted spoon, transfer beans to a medium bowl discard onion, carrot, and garlic.

2. Return broth in pot to a boil and add farro. Reduce heat and simmer, stirring occasionally, until grains are tender, 25󈞊 minutes. Remove from heat and return beans to pot season generously with salt. Let sit 15 minutes to infuse beans and grains with flavor. (If you have the time, cook the beans and the grains a day ahead so they can really soak up the broth. If not, no worries—just keep going.)

3. Cook chopped garlic, chiles, and ? cup oil in a medium skillet over medium heat, stirring often, until garlic is golden, about 4 minutes. Remove from heat and mix in rosemary. Transfer chile-garlic oil to a small bowl season with salt.

4. Wipe out skillet and heat remaining 3 Tbsp. oil over medium-high. Cook mushrooms, undisturbed, until browned underneath, about 2 minutes. Toss and continue to cook, tossing every so often, until mushrooms are browned and crisp in most spots, another 6𔃆 minutes. Splash vinegar over mushrooms, season with salt and pepper, and give skillet a few shakes to combine.

5. Ladle stew into bowls and top each with some crisped mushrooms and an egg yolk (if using) drizzle with chile-garlic oil.

6. Break egg yolk and stir into soup just before eating to give it a more silky consistency.

7. Do Ahead: Stew (without mushrooms, egg yolks, and chile-garlic oil) can be made 3 days ahead. Let cool cover and chill


Watch the video: Vegetarian Black Beans with Rice and Avocado - Eat Clean with Shira Bocar (December 2021).